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Bill Introduced in California in Response to Florida Shooting Would Expand Judges Ability to Seize Guns From Persons Deemed Dangerous

Two days after a mass shooting in Florida, a California lawmaker is seeking to revive a measure that would allow school staffs and coworkers to seek a court order to remove guns from people they believe are a danger to the public.

A man holds a young boy while kneeling at a memorial cross that honors victims of the mass shooting at a Florida high school at Pine Trail Park in Parkland on Feb. 16, 2018. (Credit: Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

A man holds a young boy while kneeling at a memorial cross that honors victims of the mass shooting at a Florida high school at Pine Trail Park in Parkland on Feb. 16, 2018. (Credit: Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) wants to expand the current law that allows family members and law enforcement officials to seek an emergency restraining order from judges based on rulings that the person owns guns and poses a public risk.

The current law, enacted after the 2014 mass shooting in Isla Vista, Calif., allows judges to order the confiscation of guns for up to 21 days.

Ting would expand the bill to allow teachers and other employees on high school and college campuses to apply for a restraining order.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.