Perris Torture Case Prompts State Bill to Tighten Regulation of Home Schools

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California lawmakers are pushing to increase regulation of home schools after a dozen siblings were discovered locked in a dirty, dark house in Riverside County.

Members of the media camp out in front of the Perris home of David Allen and Louise Anna Turpin on Jan. 16, 2018. The couple were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after their 13 children were found shackled and malnourished. (Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

Members of the media camp out in front of the Perris home of David Allen and Louise Anna Turpin on Jan. 16, 2018. The couple were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after their 13 children were found shackled and malnourished. (Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

The house in Perris had been registered as a private school — with the cheery name of Sandcastle Day School.

Last month, after a malnourished 17-year-old escaped and alerted authorities to the abuse she and her 12 siblings, ages 2 to 29, had endured there, her parents were arrested and charged with multiple counts of torture and child endangerment. David Turpin, 56, and Louise Turpin, 49, have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them and a judge has barred them from contacting their children.

David Turpin had registered with the state as the principal of Sandcastle Day, saying six school-age children were enrolled.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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