BREAKING: Bomb Threats Reported in Riverside, San Francisco, Chicago and NY With Officials Saying Connection Possible

Focus on Dreamers Breeds Resentment Among Some Other Immigrants in the U.S. Illegally

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Alessandro Negrete, a 35-year-old immigrant who is in the country without legal status, is tired of the spotlight on DACA recipients. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Alessandro Negrete, a 35-year-old immigrant who is in the country without legal status, is tired of the spotlight on DACA recipients. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Ever since Sam Paredes crossed into the U.S. illegally from Mexico nearly 30 years ago, he followed a simple philosophy of keeping his head down and trying to stay out of trouble.

The 39-year-old put in long hours for little pay as an office manager at a clothing wholesaler. He paid his taxes and hoped that after many years of waiting, there would come an immigration reform that would grant him a pathway to becoming an American citizen.

But one glimmer of hope afforded many young immigrants escaped him: Because the New York resident came too long ago, he did not qualify for immigration relief under the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA.

Now he watches as the White House and Congress continue to grapple and negotiate and argue — but at least talk about — the future of the so-called Dreamers.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.