Police Struggling to Keep up With Flood of Threats Against L.A.-Area Schools Following Florida Mass Shooting

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Students at the elite prep school Harvard-Westlake got a troubling alert as they headed to class Friday morning — their campuses had been closed because of a security threat.

A driver in a school saftey vehicle makes his way to the campus of El Camino High School in South Whittier on Feb. 21, 2018, after a threat by a student was overheard by a school safety officer. (Credit: Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty Images)

A driver in a school saftey vehicle makes his way to the campus of El Camino High School in South Whittier on Feb. 21, 2018, after a threat by a student was overheard by a school safety officer. (Credit: Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty Images)

A disturbing post on Instagram showing ammunition and a shotgun with the words “#HarvardWestlake” written across the barrel had come to school officials’ attention. The account belonged to Jonathan Martin, a former Miami Dolphins’ offensive lineman who was the victim of a high-profile bullying scandal in 2013, and is a Harvard-Westlake alumnus.

“When you’re a bully victim & a coward, your options are suicide, or revenge,” read the text of an Instagram story posted on Martin’s account. Martin was taken into custody Friday, and police said they do not believe he posed a threat to the school.

These types of threats have become a fact of life in the nine days since the Valentine’s Day shooting that left 17 students and teachers dead in a Florida high school. Almost every day this week brought a new report that sent law enforcement scrambling to decipher the meaning and intent of teenagers’ social media posts and comments to friends. School district officials said they were taking even the vaguest of threats seriously, too afraid to do otherwise.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.