Pedestrian Deaths Surge in L.A., Overall Traffic Fatalities Down Slightly

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Motorists sit in traffic on Venice Boulevard in September, when outrage over traffic safety measures led to a bid to recall Los Angeles Councilman Mike Bonin, who represents the Westside. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Motorists sit in traffic on Venice Boulevard in September, when outrage over traffic safety measures led to a bid to recall Los Angeles Councilman Mike Bonin, who represents the Westside. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Pedestrian deaths in Los Angeles have surged more than 80% in the first two years of a high-profile initiative launched by Mayor Eric Garcetti to eliminate traffic fatalities, new data show.

In 2015, 74 people on foot were killed by drivers in Los Angeles. That figure rose to 134 in 2017, the highest number in more than 15 years.

Overall, the number of bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcyclists and drivers killed in collisions on city streets fell last year by 6%, to 244, according to preliminary police data released by the city Transportation Department.

In 2015, Garcetti signed an executive order creating the Vision Zero initiative, which set the ambitious goal of eliminating traffic deaths on city streets by 2025. It called for reductions of 20% by 2017 and 50% by 2020.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.