Senate Judiciary to Host Hearing on Florida Mass School Shooting, Solutions to Gun Violence

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Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley has scheduled a hearing for the committee on the shooting last month at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and legislative actions to prevent more mass shootings.

Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) arrive for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing concerning firearm accessory regulation and enforcing federal and state reporting to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) on Capitol Hill, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) arrive for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing concerning firearm accessory regulation and enforcing federal and state reporting to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) on Capitol Hill, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The hearing is scheduled for March 14, 2018, and will focus on the reported failure of the FBI and law enforcement to follow up on red flags raised about the shooter, as well as school safety and possible gun legislation.

Since the shooting in Florida that left 17 dead, efforts are starting to be made at the state and federal level on gun control. The Florida House on Wednesday passed legislation that would impose new restrictions on firearm sales and allow some teachers and staff to carry guns in school. It will go to Republican Gov. Rick Scott for his signature. He has 15 days to sign or veto the bill.

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida said Wednesday that they’re introducing legislation that would encourage states to adopt so-called “red flag” gun laws, which allow people to file gun restraining orders to remove firearms from potentially violent individuals.

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