O.C. Supervisors Vote to Join Federal Lawsuit Against California’s ‘Sanctuary’ Laws

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The Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to move against the state's "sanctuary" laws, adding a powerful voice to a growing backlash in some conservative parts of California to the state's pro-immigrant policies.

The board voted 4 to 0 to join a federal lawsuit against California's sanctuary laws.

Senate Bill 54, which Gov. Jerry Brown signed after the Legislature passed it last year, prohibits state and local police agencies from notifying federal officials in many cases when immigrants in their custody who may potentially be subject to deportation are about to be released.

The Trump administration went to federal court to invalidate the state laws, contending that they blatantly obstruct federal immigration law and thus violate the Constitution's supremacy clause, which gives federal law precedence over state measures. That case is pending.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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