L.A. County Supervisors Approve Using Funds to Keep Emergency Homeless Shelter in Antelope Valley Open

Declaring a “shelter crisis” in the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County supervisors agreed Tuesday to keep an emergency homeless shelter operating throughout much of 2018.

In August 2017, Mike Bass sits on a bed at the Lancaster Community Shelter, the only homeless shelter in Antelope Valley at the time. It later closed until an emergency shelter was opened and approved to stay open by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on March 27, 2018. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

In August 2017, Mike Bass sits on a bed at the Lancaster Community Shelter, the only homeless shelter in Antelope Valley at the time. It later closed until an emergency shelter was opened and approved to stay open by the Los Angeles
County Board of Supervisors on March 27, 2018. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

They approved a motion directing the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority to use Measure H funds for the 93-bed shelter, which is operated by the Salvation Army in a converted medical center.

The Antelope Valley’s homeless population increased by 50% from 2016 to 2017 — from about 3,000 to 4,500 — according to latest figures released by the homeless authority. But there are no year-round facilities to house homeless people.

The 108-bed Lancaster Community Shelter, the valley’s only drop-in homeless shelter, closed its doors in August after financial struggles.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.