L.A. City Council Passes New Laws to Clear Path for Homeless Housing

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The Los Angeles City Council unanimously voted Wednesday to approve two new laws meant to smooth the way for housing homeless people.

This undated photo shows a former motel in South Los Angeles that was temporarily being used to house homeless women. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

This undated photo shows a former motel in South Los Angeles that was temporarily being used to house homeless women. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Under one of the new laws, homeless housing projects that meet a list of requirements will be able to avoid a lengthy process at City Hall that includes environmental review and can trigger a public hearing. The new ordinance will also slash parking requirements and allow "permanent supportive housing" projects to be built taller or denser than otherwise allowed.

The law will allow homeless housing projects to "go through our planning process a lot faster and for less cost," Councilman Jose Huizar said before the Wednesday vote. "That's really what this comes down to."

Planning officials estimate that those rules will ultimately make it possible to build up to an additional 200 units of homeless housing annually with government funds. Homeless advocates say it will help bolster the city goal of building 10,000 new units for homeless residents in a decade.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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