Teachers at L.A.’s Lowest-Performing Schools Don’t Often Get Evaluated, and Nearly All Do Well When They Do, Group Finds

Students at Drew Middle School watch classmates debate in this 2014 photo. Teachers at the school have not been evaluated enough, says the advocacy group Parent Revolution. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Students at Drew Middle School watch classmates debate in this 2014 photo. Teachers at the school have not been evaluated enough, says the advocacy group Parent Revolution. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

When a local advocacy group set out to see how closely teachers’ work was scrutinized in some of Los Angeles’ lowest-performing public schools, what they found alarmed them: Most of the teachers are not regularly evaluated and nearly all who are receive good ratings.

Parent Revolution’s analysis, based on public records, is the latest salvo by critics of the L.A. Unified School District and provides ammunition for those who think rigorous evaluations are key to school improvement.

It comes just days after a Rand Corp. study of a major effort that used performance evaluations of teachers as a way to boost student success. With “minor exceptions,” the study concluded, “access to effective teaching and dropout rates were not dramatically better” at schools that set up state-of-the-art evaluation systems than they were at schools that did not.

Debate over why will probably go on for decades.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.