California Prohibits Local Governments From Imposing New Taxes on Soda Until 2031

Bottles of soda are displayed in a cooler in a food truck on June 10, 2015, in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Bottles of soda are displayed in a cooler in a food truck on June 10, 2015, in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

California cities and counties won’t be allowed to tax soda for the next 12 years after Gov. Jerry Brown signed fast-moving legislation Thursday.

The bill, which was first unveiled Saturday evening, prohibits local governments from imposing new taxes on soda until 2031. It comes after a deal was struck between legislators and business and labor interests who agreed to remove an initiative from the Nov. 6 statewide ballot that would have restricted cities and counties from raising any taxes without a supermajority vote of local citizens.

In a signing statement, Brown said soda taxes “combat the dangerous and ill effects of too much sugar in the diets of children.” But he added that mayors across the state called him to support the deal because they were alarmed by the tax initiative.

Brown also reacted strongly to another part of the initiative, which would have restricted the state’s ability to raise certain fees without a two-thirds vote of the Legislature.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.