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More than a week after the arrest of her father Jose Luis Garcia as he watered his lawn, Natalie Garcia tries to console her daughter Marley Hodges outside their home in Arleta. Experts say in the Trump administration's war against illegal immigration, it has lowered the bar for whom immigration agents can go after. (Credit: Gabriel S. Scarlett / Los Angeles Times)

More than a week after the arrest of her father Jose Luis Garcia as he watered his lawn, Natalie Garcia tries to console her daughter Marley Hodges outside their home in Arleta. Experts say in the Trump administration's war against illegal immigration, it has lowered the bar for whom immigration agents can go after. (Credit: Gabriel S. Scarlett / Los Angeles Times)

In 2001, Jose Luis Garcia was convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence charge. Whatever tumult it caused within his family, the event seemed to fade with every passing year as Garcia became a grandfather and inched closer toward retirement.

Earlier this month, the nearly 20-year-old conviction came roaring back when immigration agents arrested the 62-year-old as he drank coffee and watered the lawn of his Arleta home.

His daughter, Natalie Garcia, thought there must be a mistake. Her father has been a lawful permanent resident since 1988. He carries his green card in his wallet.

“We thought this was happening to people like they said — criminals, the gang members,” she said in an interview between sobs.

Read the full story on LATimes.com