Gov. Brown to Consider New DNA Testing on Death Row Inmate Who’s Maintained Innocence in Chino Hills Murders

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Reverend Jesse Jackson walks towards the California State Prison at San Quentin for a meeting with convicted killer Kevin Cooper on Feb. 9, 2004. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Reverend Jesse Jackson walks towards the California State Prison at San Quentin for a meeting with convicted killer Kevin Cooper on Feb. 9, 2004. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Gov. Jerry Brown this week said that he would consider additional forensic testing to determine whether a man sentenced to death for a quadruple murder in Chino Hills should have a chance at clemency.

Through more than a dozen rejected appeals, Kevin Cooper, now 60, has maintained his innocence in the murders that rocked the area in June 1983.

When 11-year-old Christopher Hughes did not return from a sleepover in time for church one Sunday morning, his father went to a hilltop home to pick him up.

He peered through the window and discovered the bloodied bodies of Doug and Peggy Ryen; their 10-year-old daughter, Jessica; and his son Christopher. The victims had been stabbed 143 times with an ice pick, an ax and a knife. The Ryens’ 8-year-old son, Joshua, was slashed in the throat but survived.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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