5 Years After Devastating Fire Near Yosemite, Trump Demands More Logging

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Ecologist Chad Hanson examines year-old saplings planted last year in the footprint of the Rim fire. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Ecologist Chad Hanson examines year-old saplings planted last year in the footprint of the Rim fire. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

The Rim fire in 2013 brought devastation to a vast swath of Sierra Nevada forests west of Yosemite National Park. But the third largest wildfire in state history also seemed to have worked a political miracle, at least for a while.

In the aftermath of the blaze, environmental organizations, timber interests, state officials and the U.S. Forest Service buried decades of discord to forge an ambitious restoration and reforestation plan.

Its centerpiece is a federally funded community and watershed resilience program touted as a model for helping small town economies and wildlife habitats bounce back after wildfires throughout the western United States.

But now, five years after the fire, there is growing concern that the grand partnership is crumbling due to delays, frustration and a tug-of-war between preservationists and logging advocates backed by the Trump administration.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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