How to Help Those Affected by SoCal Brush Fires

California’s Record-Setting Summer Heat Brings Death, Destruction

Facing temperatures in the 90s, Guillermo Salazar of Reseda takes a break from mountain biking at San Vicente Mountain Park in Los Angeles in July 2018. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Facing temperatures in the 90s, Guillermo Salazar of Reseda takes a break from mountain biking at San Vicente Mountain Park in Los Angeles in July 2018. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

At Scripps Pier in San Diego, the surface water reached the highest temperature in 102 years of records, 78.8 degrees.

Palm Springs had its warmest July on record, with an average of 97.4 degrees. Death Valley experienced its hottest month on record, with the average temperature hitting 108.1. Park rangers said the heat was too much for some typically hardy birds that died in the broiling conditions.

Across California, the nighttime brought little relief, recording the highest minimum temperature statewide of any month since 1895, rising to 64.9.

California has been getting hotter for some time, but July was in a league of its own. The intense heat fueled fires across the state, from San Diego County to Redding, that have burned more than 1,000 homes and killed eight. It brought heat waves that overwhelmed electrical systems, leaving swaths of Los Angeles without power for days.

A graph shows California's average summertime minimum temperature rising from the 1900s to the 2010s.(Credit: Los Angeles Times)

A graph shows California’s average summertime minimum temperature rising from the 1900s to the 2010s.(Credit: Los Angeles Times)

Read the full story on LATimes.com.