California Lawmakers Pass Expanded Gun-Seizure Bill in Response to Parkland Mass Shooting

People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida after a shooting was reported at the campus on Feb. 14, 2018. (Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida after a shooting was reported at the campus on Feb. 14, 2018. (Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

In response to a mass shooting six months ago at a Florida high school, California lawmakers on Tuesday sent the governor a bill that would allow teachers, employers and co-workers to ask judges to remove guns from people they see as a danger to the public.

The state Senate voted to expand the state’s gun-violence restraining order law, which currently allows family members and law enforcement to petition the court to temporarily remove guns from persons seen as a threat to the public.

Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) said he introduced the bill in response to the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., in which a 19-year-old former student allegedly killed 17 people.

“As we saw in the February massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, teachers and administrators saw early signs that the suspected gunman, a student, could be a threat,” Ting said. “We want to give schools in California another tool to prevent more campus tragedies.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.