California Bill That Would Set Nation’s Strongest Net Neutrality Protections Advances to Senate

Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communication Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules Dec. 14, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communication Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules Dec. 14, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

California lawmakers advanced an ambitious proposal Thursday to prevent broadband providers from hindering or manipulating access to the internet, bringing the state closer to enacting the strongest net neutrality protections in the country.

The legislation by Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) would bring back Obama-era internet rules rolled back by federal regulators this year, the latest volley cast by state leaders already feuding with the Trump administration over immigration and climate protection policies.

The proposal prevents internet service providers from blocking or slowing down websites and video streams or charging websites fees for faster speeds. But it also goes further than the old regulations and measures taken up by other states, placing new limits on certain data plans and tasking the state’s attorney general with investigating cases in which companies might be evading the rules.

On the Assembly floor, Republicans argued that the state was going too far and would create a patchwork of state and federal laws that would be cumbersome on companies and hinder innovation.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Correction: The headline on a previous version of this post mischaracterized where the bill was in the legislative process.