California Considers Making List of Buildings Most Likely to Collapse During Major Earthquake

Crushed cars sit underneath a collapsed apartment building in the 19100 block of Victory Boulevard after the 1994 Northridge earthquake. (Credit: Boris Yaro / Los Angeles Times)

Crushed cars sit underneath a collapsed apartment building in the 19100 block of Victory Boulevard after the 1994 Northridge earthquake. (Credit: Boris Yaro / Los Angeles Times)

Should you know if the building you live or work in might be particularly susceptible to collapse in the next California earthquake? The governor could decide on that soon.

The California Legislature has sent to Gov. Jerry Brown a bill that would require cities and counties in the state’s most seismically vulnerable areas to create lists of buildings that could be at higher risk of major damage or collapse in an earthquake.

There’s a big limitation to the bill — it does not provide funding. The law would take effect only if state officials can find a source of funding for the project. But backers of the bill say creating a list of possibly vulnerable buildings would represent a major step in alerting Californians whether the buildings in which they live and work should receive more study to determine whether they’re at risk in an earthquake.

“California contains thousands of buildings that are known to present an unacceptably high earthquake risk of death, injury and damage,” says the proposed legislation, AB 2681, which was written by Assemblyman Adrin Nazarian (D-North Hollywood). “Protecting our state’s economy, affordable-housing stock and social fabric from the long-lasting turmoil of earthquakes is of utmost importance.”

Read the full story at LATimes.com