Police Chiefs Warn of Increased Crime if California Allows Home Deliveries of Marijuana

Various strains of medical marijuana available for recreational use arranged for display at a dispensary in Los Angeles on February 8, 2018. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

Various strains of medical marijuana available for recreational use arranged for display at a dispensary in Los Angeles on February 8, 2018. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

The prospect of vans loaded with pot delivering to homes in quiet Morgan Hill makes Police Chief David Swing uneasy.

Like most cities in the state, the upscale San Jose suburb has banned pot shops. But now, as California considers a proposal to allow marijuana businesses to send home-delivery vans into communities where retail stores are prohibited, Swing and others in law enforcement say they are preparing for the worst.

“This will make it easier and more lucrative to rob a delivery person than a liquor store,” said Swing, who is president of the California Police Chiefs Assn. He notes drivers would be allowed to carry up to $10,000 in cash. “Robberies are the tip of the iceberg. They can lead to other crimes, including aggravated assaults and homicides.”

Law enforcement leaders and city officials statewide have lined up to oppose the delivery proposal currently under consideration by California Bureau of Cannabis Control chief Lori Ajax. They were among the thousands of people who packed three public hearings recently held by the bureau on new marijuana regulations.

Read the full story on LATimes.com