Trump Expresses Suspicion About U.N. Climate Report: ‘I Want to Look at Who Drew It’

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President Donald Trump expressed suspicion Tuesday about a United Nations report warning of dire consequences of unchecked climate change in the next two decades, but said he will look at it.

“It was given to me. And I want to look at who drew it. You know, which group drew it. I can give you reports that are fabulous and I can give you reports that aren’t so good,” Trump told reporters on the South Lawn.

It was his first comment about the landmark study that evaluates consequences the world will face if global temperatures increase by 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius — 2.7 or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

Trump’s administration has largely ignored calls to take steps toward reducing harmful carbon emissions and Trump said last year he would withdraw the United States from the landmark Paris climate agreement. Instead, Trump has advocated for more coal energy and loosened regulations on vehicle emissions.

Still, the President said Tuesday he would read the report, which was unveiled over the weekend.

“I will be looking at it, absolutely,” Trump said.

Governments around the world must take “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” to avoid disastrous levels of global warming, says a stark new report from the global scientific authority on climate change.

The report issued Monday by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says the planet will reach the crucial threshold of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels by as early as 2030, precipitating the risk of extreme drought, wildfires, floods and food shortages for hundreds of millions of people.

The date, which falls well within the lifetime of many people alive today, is based on current levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

The planet is already two-thirds of the way there, with global temperatures having warmed about 1 degree Celsius. Avoiding going even higher will require significant action in the next few years.

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