Judge Rules L.A. County Sheriff’s Officials Must Reveal If They Know Which Deputies Have Matching Tattoos in Secret Society Inquiry

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A tattoo worn by L.A. County Sheriff's Deputy Samuel Aldama is seen in a photo displayed during a press conference held by the Sweeney Firm on July 14, 2018. (Credit: KTLA)

A tattoo worn by L.A. County Sheriff’s Deputy Samuel Aldama is seen in a photo displayed during a press conference held by the Sweeney Firm on July 14, 2018. (Credit: KTLA)

A judge said Thursday that Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department officials must reveal whether they know the names of deputies who have matching skull tattoos at the Compton Station.

Allegations about a secret society of inked deputies at the station have been at the center of a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of Donta Taylor, who was shot and killed by deputies in 2016.

Superior Court Judge Michael P. Vicencia stopped short of ordering the department to force deputies to bare their skin to show whether they have tattoos, but he left open the possibility that officers could be compelled to answer questions about their ink if they’re given the chance to object first.

“I’m not saying you shouldn’t get the information,” Vicencia said to the family’s attorney at the hearing in Long Beach. “But this is unusual. I don’t know I’ve ever seen this before.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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