California Falling Short on Climate Change Goals Because Driving Is Increasing: State Report

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Traffic backs as it travels northbound on the Golden Gate Bridge on May 1, 2018. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Traffic backs as it travels northbound on the Golden Gate Bridge on May 1, 2018. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

California is failing to meet its goals to reduce vehicle travel, imperiling efforts to achieve ambitious greenhouse gas reduction targets, according to a state report released Monday.

The report by the California Air Resources Board, the state’s climate change regulator, found that carbon emissions per capita from vehicle travel in California were increasing. That’s despite a decade-old law that required regions across the state to plan for housing growth so that people could live closer to where they work or public transit and reduce their time on the state’s roadways.

“California — at the state, regional and local levels — has not yet gone far enough in making the systemic and structural changes to how we build and invest in communities that are needed to meet state climate goals,” the report said.

The state’s inability to curb the amount of driving puts it at risk of failing to meet overall climate change goals. The state hit its 2020 goal for reducing emissions below 1990 levels four years in advance largely because of major improvements to the electricity grid. But climate regulators warned that the state’s goal to cut emissions 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 won’t be met without a major turnaround in the transportation sector.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.