L.A. County Supervisors Approve $4.5M-Plan to Study ‘New Realities’ in Fighting Fires

The Woolsey Fire approaches homes on Nov. 9, 2018 in Malibu. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

The Woolsey Fire approaches homes on Nov. 9, 2018 in Malibu. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a $4.5-million plan Tuesday to reduce the strain on the Los Angeles County Fire Department, which responds to devastating incidents such as the Woolsey fire but also provides 24-hour emergency services across the county’s 2,300 square miles.

The supervisors’ plan seeks to educate the public and leaders in the 59 municipalities the department serves about the “new realities” in staffing, equipment and facilities — and to gather their input about their experiences during recent fires.

The new effort comes months after the board raised concerns about the department’s aging stations and equipment, and weeks after the Woolsey fire burned more than 90,000 acres in Los Angeles and Ventura counties.

The supervisors said the fire has highlighted a new reality for the department: It must respond to wildfires in an era of drought conditions and prolonged periods of dry, windy weather while also providing emergency medical services to 4 million county residents across 2,300 square miles.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.