Medical Care Improves at Migrant Camps as San Diego County, Mexico Officials Work to Avert Health Crisis

A Central American migrant family travelling in a caravan, stand by a tent at a makeshift camp, backdropped by the US-Mexico border fence, in a street near a closed shelter, in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico on Dec. 7, 2018. (Credit: GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)

A Central American migrant family travelling in a caravan, stand by a tent at a makeshift camp, backdropped by the US-Mexico border fence, in a street near a closed shelter, in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico on Dec. 7, 2018. (Credit: GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)

Two months pregnant, Jessica Mejia of Honduras received flu and tetanus vaccinations and prenatal vitamins in the health clinic at Tijuana’s El Barretal shelter Friday.

She was one of many in the 6,000-strong migrant caravan to receive checkups, medications and even minor surgery from a growing set of medical services that added a mobile hospital last week.

It’s a far cry, said Jose Mateo, 30, of Guatemala, from the single medicine dispensary initially available to migrants who began arriving at Benito Juarez Sports Complex in mid-November.

“Everything here is more organized,” Mateo said. “It changes everything in the sense that we have better treatment.”

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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