Annual Count Finds 11 Bald Eagles Living in San Bernardino National Forest

A bald eagle is seen in a photo released by San Bernardino National Forest officials on Dec. 17, 2018, along with results from the agency's annual count of the species.

A bald eagle is seen in a photo released by San Bernardino National Forest officials on Dec. 17, 2018, along with results from the agency's annual count of the species.

A canvassing of San Bernardino National Forest this month turned up nearly a dozen bald eagles there, officials said Monday.

A total of 11 birds — six adults and five juveniles — were found, a slight decrease from the 15 counted last year, according to a U.S. Forest Service news release.

More than 100 volunteers helped conduct the count of America’s national bird. The survey area spans five lakes within San Bernardino National Forest and two California State Park recreation areas.

“Several dozen bald eagles typically spend their winter vacations around Southern California’s lakes, adding to a few resident nesting bald eagles that stay year-round,” the news release states.

The survey helps officials monitor the local population and the birds’ migration patterns.

Bird lovers can also track their movements via a live feed from the bald eagle nest at Big Bear Lake.

The bald eagle was once considered an endangered species, but the population has recovered over the past four decades and they were removed from the endangered list in 2007.

This is 40th installment of the annual survey in San Bernardino National Forest. Additional counts will be held on the second Saturday of the first three months of next year: Jan. 12, Feb. 9 and March 9.

Click here for more information on how to participate.

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