Despite Transformation of California’s Justice System, Crime Is up, Leading Critics to Call for Rollbacks: Analysis

Stolen objects are displayed while Capt. Lillian Carranza, second from left, shares details about arrests made in connection with recent burglaries at the homes of celebrities in this undated photo. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Stolen objects are displayed while Capt. Lillian Carranza, second from left, shares details about arrests made in connection with recent burglaries at the homes of celebrities in this undated photo. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Over the last decade, California has led the nation in reducing its prison population.

The state has shortened sentences and diverted some offenders to the counties for incarceration and supervision, transforming California’s criminal justice system into what supporters hope will become a humane model around the country.

But amid the changes, crime has increased in recent years, sparking debate about the causes and giving ammunition to those leading a new effort to roll back some of the reforms.

An analysis by the Marshall Project and the Los Angeles Times found that California’s crime rates remain near historic lows, but overall crime spiked in both 2012 and 2015, the years that immediately followed two major statewide measures aimed at decreasing the number of people in prison. Those jumps were mainly driven by increases in property crimes, particularly thefts from motor vehicles.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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