BREAKING: At Least 2 Hurt in Shooting in Downtown L.A.

LAUSD Teachers Prepare to Strike Monday

Teachers and students march as they protest against cuts to education funding during the "March for Public Education" rally in Los Angeles on Dec. 15, 2018. (Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

Teachers and students march as they protest against cuts to education funding during the "March for Public Education" rally in Los Angeles on Dec. 15, 2018. (Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

The message has been clear for months from the president of the Los Angeles teachers union: Not only does the L.A. Unified School District have no deficit, it has a huge reserve, more than large enough to meet the union’s demands for higher wages, smaller classes and schools staffed every day with the supportive services they need.

That’s partly true: The district hasn’t recently had deficits, but Alex Caputo-Pearl is ignoring future projections.

L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner has seemed just as certain when he declares the district on the brink of insolvency.

That could be true, but if it is, why is the district able to offer any pay raises?

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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