Despite Threat of Big Earthquake, Many Cities Ignore the Danger

Kehl Tonga, a supervisor for Cal-Quake Construction, adds cement to the base of a steel moment frame, installed to retrofit the flimsy first story of an apartment building in Hollywood in this undated photo. (Credit: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Kehl Tonga, a supervisor for Cal-Quake Construction, adds cement to the base of a steel moment frame, installed to retrofit the flimsy first story of an apartment building in Hollywood in this undated photo. (Credit: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The Northridge earthquake that hit 25 years ago offered alarming evidence of how vulnerable many types of buildings are to collapse from major shaking.

It toppled hundreds of apartments, smashed brittle concrete structures and tore apart brick buildings.

Since then, some cities have taken significant steps to make those buildings safer by requiring costly retrofitting aimed at protecting those inside and preserving the housing supply.

But many others have ignored the seismic threat. And that has created an uneven landscape that in the coming years will leave some cities significantly better prepared to withstand a big quake than others.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.