L.A. Teachers Capture Blue Wave of Support Despite LAUSD Saying It Can’t Afford Their Demands

Westminster Elementary kindergarten instructor Jessica Dunn is one of many L.A. teachers who have captured public sympathy during their strike in January 2019, challenging the Los Angeles Unified Schoo District's strategy of saying the funds for their demands simply aren't there. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Westminster Elementary kindergarten instructor Jessica Dunn is one of many L.A. teachers who have captured public sympathy during their strike in January 2019, challenging the Los Angeles Unified Schoo District's strategy of saying the funds for their demands simply aren't there. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

A week ago, Los Angeles schools Supt. Austin Beutner went to Sacramento to nail down support for the school district if teachers decided to go on strike.

He came back sounding very optimistic that lawmakers understood the district’s finances were so perilous that it could not afford what the teachers were demanding.

But the images of teachers marching in the rain, often cheered by parents and students, have amounted to powerful politics in this blue state, and have weakened the district’s hand.

The teachers have told personal stories that many find hard to argue with: that too many students shouldn’t be crowded into classes, that schools should have nurses on hand every day. And that has up to now trumped Beutner’s grim financial diagnosis, even though it was largely endorsed by a county oversight agency.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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