California’s Reservoirs Receive 580 Billion Gallons of Water From January Storms

In this file photo, water pours down a spillway out of Nicasio Reservoir in Nicasio on Jan. 12, 2017. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

In this file photo, water pours down a spillway out of Nicasio Reservoir in Nicasio on Jan. 12, 2017. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Storms swept through California in recent weeks, drenching striking teachers and blocking roads with debris flows in recent burn areas, but they weren’t all bad: The state’s reservoirs are healthy and full, a good sign for the water supply.

Nearly all California reservoirs are at or above average levels. Overall, 580 billion gallons of water were added across the state since Jan. 1. Some major water sources, such as the San Luis Reservoir in Merced County and Lake Perris in Riverside County, are near capacity.

The Sierra Nevada snowpack— a major source of water which state water departments monitor throughout the year — is looking good, too, with snow measuring 115% of average Tuesday, compared with 26% of average the same day last year.

“Right now, we’re doing OK,” said Department of Water Resources spokesman Chris Orrock. “We had some good storms … that pushed our totals above average.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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