Construction on $1 Billion Downtown L.A. Real Estate Development Stalls Due to Finance Shortfall

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A banner of China's Oceanwide Real Estate Group is displayed at the construction site of the property, purchased in 2014, located across the street from the Staples Center in Los Angeles, on May 17, 2016. A huge surge in Chinese buying of both commercial U.S. real estate and residential property last year took their five-year investment total to more than $110 billion, according to a study from the Asia Society and Rosen Consulting Group, as Chinese nationals became the largest foreign buyers of U.S. homes. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

A banner of China's Oceanwide Real Estate Group is displayed at the construction site of the property, purchased in 2014, located across the street from the Staples Center in Los Angeles, on May 17, 2016. A huge surge in Chinese buying of both commercial U.S. real estate and residential property last year took their five-year investment total to more than $110 billion, according to a study from the Asia Society and Rosen Consulting Group, as Chinese nationals became the largest foreign buyers of U.S. homes. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

Construction on Oceanwide Plaza, one of the biggest real estate development projects in downtown Los Angeles, has stalled in what may be a shortfall in financing from the project’s Chinese owner.

The condominium, hotel and retail complex across the street from Staples Center is expected to cost more than $1 billion and be a key part of the flashy entertainment, hotel and residential district emerging along Figueroa Street.

The plaza is being built by Oceanwide Holdings, a Beijing-based publicly traded conglomerate that reported revenue of $2.37 billion in 2017. The company said in a statement Thursday that the hold-up is due to a recapitalization of the project and that work will resume by the middle of next month.

Any halt of a Chinese-backed real estate project, however, is bound to raise concerns that it may be related to Chinese government policies restricting the flow of money out of the country. The policies, put in place in 2016, sent shock waves through real estate circles because China has become a major investor and developer in the U.S.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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