Author of California Police Transparency Law Says It Was Meant to Open up Past Records

A graduation exercise for new officers at the Los Angeles Police Academy is seen in this photo from 2018. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

A graduation exercise for new officers at the Los Angeles Police Academy is seen in this photo from 2018. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Weighing in on a statewide legal battle over law enforcement records, the author of California’s landmark police transparency law formally notified the state Senate on Thursday that her bill was intended to open up records from the past as well as those going forward.

The move comes amid a flurry of litigation by police unions across the state that are seeking to block access to records of incidents that took place before Senate Bill 1421 went into effect Jan. 1. The police unions argue that the law would violate officer privacy protections if applied to cases predating the beginning of the year.

In a one-page letter to the state Senate Rules Committee, Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), sought to clarify the intent of the law, which opens up records of shootings by officers, severe uses of force and confirmed cases of sexual assault and lying by officers.

In the letter obtained by The Times, Skinner said any relevant discipline records kept by a government agency should be disclosed under the new law, which was approved last year.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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