‘White Glove Bandit’ Sentenced For 3-County String of Robberies

A Yucaipa man dubbed one of three “White Glove Bandits” by the FBI received a sentence of nearly 17 years in federal prison Monday for his role in three bank robberies and three business robberies in Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties, authorities said.

A judge's gavel is shown in a file photo. (Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)

A judge’s gavel is shown in a file photo. (Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)

Sheyenne Lee Parsons, 38, pleaded guilty in August to two counts of armed bank robbery and one count of using a firearm in a crime of violence, U.S. Department of Justice spokesman Thom Mrozek said in a written statement.

“But in a plea agreement, Parsons admitted to participating in three armed bank robberies and three retail store robberies, two of which were armed,” Mrozek said.

The crimes took place between April 14, 2015, and July 21, 2015, prosecutors said. They targeted a Community Valley Bank in Palm Desert, a Wells Fargo branch in Irvine, a Chase branch in Banning, a Toys “R” Us store in Redlands, a Boot Barn in Upland and a David’s Bridal store in Ontario.

Parsons is already serving a five-year state prison sentence for robbing a U.S. Bank branch in Culver City on April 20, 2015,  according to Mrozek. The federal sentence will run concurrently with the state sentence.

Two alleged accomplices in the spate of robberies are awaiting trial in connection with the crimes attributed to the “White Glove Bandits.”

Federal investigators gave the suspects the moniker due to their penchant to wear white, latex gloves during their heists,  officials said.

The crimes “terrified” workers and customers, prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memo.

During the crime in Irvine, which prosecutors called a “takeover” robbery, “Parsons collected more than $20,000 from victim tellers while another robber pointed a gun at bank employees and demanded money,” Mrozek said.

In addition to a sentence of 201 months in federal prison, Parsons was also ordered to pay nearly $35,000 in restitution to the banks and stores he robbed.

 

 

 

 

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