Partial Government Shutdown Delayed 60,000 Immigration Court Hearings

Honduran father Juan and his six-year-old son Anthony depart after attending Sunday Mass on Sept. 9, 2018, in Oakland. They fled their country, leaving many family members behind, and crossed the U.S. border in April at a lawful port of entry in Brownsville, Texas seeking asylum. They were soon separated and spent the next 85 days apart in detention. Juan was sent to Tulsa, Oklahoma, while his son was sent to a detention shelter in New York. They were one of almost 2,600 families separated due to the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy. (Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Honduran father Juan and his six-year-old son Anthony depart after attending Sunday Mass on Sept. 9, 2018, in Oakland. They fled their country, leaving many family members behind, and crossed the U.S. border in April at a lawful port of entry in Brownsville, Texas seeking asylum. They were soon separated and spent the next 85 days apart in detention. Juan was sent to Tulsa, Oklahoma, while his son was sent to a detention shelter in New York. They were one of almost 2,600 families separated due to the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy. (Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The partial government shutdown that ended last month has delayed about 60,000 immigration court hearings.

Kathryn Mattingly, a spokeswoman for the Executive Office for Immigration Review, said Friday that hearings have been rescheduled for the earliest available date.

With more than 800,000 pending cases, the immigration courts overseen by the Department of Justice are notoriously backlogged and at least one judge said she has no openings on her calendar until 2022.

Mattingly says immigrants can file a motion asking for an earlier date if needed.

The 35-day shutdown over President Donald Trump’s demand for a border wall halted immigration court hearings for immigrants who were not detained, including asylum seekers hoping to stay in the United States.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.