Experts on Human Trafficking Are Skeptical Trump’s Border Wall Would Reduce the Crime

In this undated photo, a man stands along the border wall at Playas Tijuana that's been fortified with concertina wire. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

In this undated photo, a man stands along the border wall at Playas Tijuana that's been fortified with concertina wire. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

In President Trump’s repeated calls for a border wall, he has recently turned his focus to the horrors of human trafficking along the southern border.

“Even one woman or one child trafficked is too many,” Trump said in a Feb. 1 speech at the White House. “But there are thousands and thousands and thousands…”

While a presidential platform is often appreciated on social issues, some trafficking victim advocates say the focus ignores the broader picture of trafficking in the United States.

“Claims that a wall will stop vast amounts of human trafficking are not only inaccurate and misleading,” Bradley Myles, chief executive of Polaris, a nonprofit organization that runs the National Human Trafficking Hotline, said in a statement, “they also harm our efforts to educate the public on the true nature of this crime.”

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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