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William H. Macy Spoke of Daughter’s Applications Stress Before Wife Was Indicted in College Admissions Bribery Scam

Felicity Huffman, right, and William H. Macy attend the Netflix 2019 Golden Globes After Party in Los Angeles on Jan. 6, 2019. (Credit: Tommaso Boddi / Getty Images for Netflix)

Felicity Huffman, right, and William H. Macy attend the Netflix 2019 Golden Globes After Party in Los Angeles on Jan. 6, 2019. (Credit: Tommaso Boddi / Getty Images for Netflix)

William H. Macy talked about his daughter’s “stressful” college application process earlier this year.

The actor’s comments came two months before his wife, Felicity Huffman, was among more than 30 parents charged in a sweeping college admissions bribery scam.

Macy said in the January interview with Parade magazine that his family was “in the thick of college application time, which is so stressful.”

Huffman was one of 13 people, including actress Lori Loughlin, taken into custody Tuesday in Los Angeles. Authorities have not said why Macy wasn’t charged.

Court documents say Huffman paid $15,000 she disguised as a charitable donation so her daughter could partake in the college entrance cheating scam.

The documents state a cooperating witness met with Huffman and her husband, actor William H. Macy, at their Los Angeles home and explained to them that he “controlled” a testing center and could have somebody secretly change her daughter’s answers. The person told investigators the couple agreed to the plan.

Macy was in the Los Angeles courtroom late Tuesday afternoon when a judge ruled Huffman could be released on $250,000 bond.

A magistrate judge ordered the “Desperate Housewives” star to restrict her travel to the continental United States.

Macy has not been charged; authorities haven’t said why. Representatives for Huffman haven’t returned a message seeking comment.

The founder of an admissions consulting company pleaded guilty earlier Tuesday in Boston to running the scheme. A recently fired Stanford sailing coach also pleaded guilty in Boston to accepting bribes.

Authorities say it is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice.

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