Authorities Pursue Vehicle Through Pasadena Area

Elite SoCal Prep Schools Get Subpoenas from Feds in College Admissions Scheme: Sources

William “Rick” Singer, the Newport Beach consultant accused of leading the scheme, leaves Boston Federal Court after being charged with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to defraud the United States, and obstruction of justice on March 12, 2019, in Boston. Singer is among several charged in alleged college admissions scam. (Credit: Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

William “Rick” Singer, the Newport Beach consultant accused of leading the scheme, leaves Boston Federal Court after being charged with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to defraud the United States, and obstruction of justice on March 12, 2019, in Boston. Singer is among several charged in alleged college admissions scam. (Credit: Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

The federal investigation into a massive cheating scandal in which prominent actors and business leaders got their children into elite universities included seeking records from several prominent Southern California prep schools, according to two sources familiar with the probe.

The sources did not name the schools but said they are some of the most well-known private institutions in the area. They said federal authorities issued subpoenas for records involving some of the students involved in the fraud case.

One source with knowledge of the investigation stressed that officials are not at this point accusing the schools of wrongdoing but rather seeking information about student performance and other details.

The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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