L.A. County Rejects Screening Tool to Prevent Homelessness, Accuses Nonprofit of Misusing Records

A homeless man sleeps in front of his tent along Van Ness Avenue in downtown San Francisco, California on June, 27, 2016. (Credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

A homeless man sleeps in front of his tent along Van Ness Avenue in downtown San Francisco, California on June, 27, 2016. (Credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Hoping to lower the cost of mitigating homelessness by preventing people from becoming homeless in the first place, a Los Angeles research group says it has created a screening tool that can predict who is likely to become chronically homeless after losing a job or leaving the foster-care system.

The Economic Roundtable published a report Wednesday, offering its statistical model as a way for Los Angeles County workers to target their resources early to keep people from sliding into long-term homelessness.

But county officials are declining to use it.

Instead, they have accused the Roundtable — a nonprofit that has conducted extensive studies on homelessness — of misusing millions of records from county and state agencies, including statistics on employment, healthcare, homelessness, as well as involvement in the criminal justice and foster care systems.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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