Bill to Ban Paper Receipts in California Passes 1st Legislative Hurdle

Nikki Boxer of Manhattan Beach holds a receipt from a CVS drugstore on March 25, 2019. (Credit: Diya Chacko / Los Angeles Times)

Nikki Boxer of Manhattan Beach holds a receipt from a CVS drugstore on March 25, 2019. (Credit: Diya Chacko / Los Angeles Times)

Those glossy paper receipts that are often trashed before a shopper even leaves a store could become a relic of the past under a bill that cleared its first hurdle in the state Legislature on Monday.

Modeled after a new state law requiring that plastic straws be given in restaurants only upon request, the bill would require businesses to provide electronic receipts by default unless a customer asks for a paper one.

Assembly Bill 161 by Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) said his bill is an easy way to reduce paper waste in the state while addressing consumers’ frustrations with excessively long receipts. Customers have taken to social media for years to complain and poke fun at the size of their receipts, particularly at CVS drugstore, posting pictures of the coupon-packed printouts measuring taller than a refrigerator.

“If we are looking at reducing waste, probably the easiest thing we can do is get rid of the material that someone hands us that we don’t want that we hold onto until we get to the next trash can and then throw away,” said Nick Lapis of Californians Against Waste, a bill supporter.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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