After Years of Inquiries, L.A. Still Discriminates Against Disabled Renters, Feds Say

North Hollywood resident Mei Ling speaks at a 2017 news conference about a lawsuit she filed, joined by the U.S. Department of Justice, alleging that the city of Los Angeles had reaped millions by falsely claiming it provided sufficient housing for people with disabilities. (Credit: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

North Hollywood resident Mei Ling speaks at a 2017 news conference about a lawsuit she filed, joined by the U.S. Department of Justice, alleging that the city of Los Angeles had reaped millions by falsely claiming it provided sufficient housing for people with disabilities. (Credit: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

A Los Angeles program for developing affordable housing continues to discriminate against people with disabilities, producing kitchens, bathrooms, balconies and other living spaces that aren’t safely accessible to wheelchair users, federal officials said Monday.

In a 19-page letter, the Department of Housing and Urban Development said city officials failed to provide adequate oversight of the developers who built low-income apartments with federal funds.

As a result, those buildings do not comply with federal housing requirements and the Americans With Disabilities Act, the agency wrote.

The letter is the latest piece of bad news for the city on the disabled-housing front. Two years ago, the Department of Justice announced it had joined a whistle-blower lawsuit on the same topic, alleging city officials committed fraud by asserting that homes built with federal funds were fully accessible to wheelchair users, renters with hearing impairments and others with disabilities.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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