‘We’re Going to Dramatically See a Change in Earthquake Rates,’ Expert Says Amid California Quake Drought

A building is seen destroyed following a reported 6.0 earthquake on August 24, 2014 in Napa. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A building is seen destroyed following a reported 6.0 earthquake on August 24, 2014 in Napa. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

California is in an earthquake drought.

It has been almost four years since the state experienced its last earthquake of magnitude 6 or stronger — in Napa. Southern California felt its last big quake on Easter Sunday 2010, and that shaker was actually centered across the border, causing the most damage in Mexicali.

Experts know this calm period will eventually end, with destructive results. They just don’t know when this well-documented geological pattern will shift.

“Earthquake rates are quite variable: We have a decade or two where we don’t have many earthquakes, and people expect that’s what California is always like,” said Elizabeth Cochran, seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Eventually, “we’re going to dramatically see a change in earthquake rates.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com

Earthquakes shown occurred in California and within 30 miles of the state's coast or border since March 1, 1969. (Credit: Jon Schleuss / Los Angeles Times)

Earthquakes shown occurred in California and within 30 miles of the state’s coast or border since March 1, 1969. (Credit: Jon Schleuss / Los Angeles Times)

 

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