Homelessness Isn’t Huge in Northwest San Fernando Valley – But It’s a Major Issue in City Council Race

A homeless woman walks along the railroad right-of-way after Los Angeles police officers order homeless people out of an encampment in Chatsworth in April 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

A homeless woman walks along the railroad right-of-way after Los Angeles police officers order homeless people out of an encampment in Chatsworth in April 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

In Los Angeles, the San Fernando Valley neighborhoods of Chatsworth, Porter Ranch and Granada Hills are about as far as you can get from skid row.

Fewer people live without shelter in this suburban stretch of the city than in any other L.A. City Council district, according to the last available data from the homeless count.

Yet homelessness has been a simmering topic here as more than a dozen candidates vie for a seat on the City Council, exposing stark divisions over how to address the needs of the destitute and the concerns of other residents. The June election, which will probably be followed by an August runoff, could decide how homelessness is confronted in the northwest Valley.

“It is arguably the No. 1 issue I hear about from voters,” said candidate Scott Abrams, who works as district director to U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Northridge). “We moved to the North Valley and West Valley for a high quality of life. Good schools. Safe streets. Clean streets.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.