Inglewood Spent Millions Soundproofing Homes Against LAX Noise, But Left Poorer Residents Out

A jetliner flies over the 3600 block of 104th Street in Inglewood in an undated photo. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

A jetliner flies over the 3600 block of 104th Street in Inglewood in an undated photo. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Inglewood spent millions of dollars in public funds to soundproof middle-class areas of the city while bypassing one of the poorest neighborhoods where the roar from the Los Angeles International Airport flight path is loudest, according to a Times data analysis.

Over the last several decades, the Federal Aviation Administration and Los Angeles World Airports have given the city nearly $400 million to purchase and demolish hundreds of homes around the flight path and soundproof thousands of others.

A Times review of local and federal records shows Inglewood spent the money for soundproofing disproportionately in middle-class — and primarily single-family — neighborhoods on the east side of the city, farthest from the airport. Most of the eligible homes there received soundproofing.

Meanwhile, the city’s zoning rules prohibited improvements in a struggling neighborhood of about 1,200 homes and apartments along the Century Boulevard corridor.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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