‘Countless Unfinished Dreams’: Los Angeles City Council Announces $50,000 Reward in Fatal Shooting of USC Music Student

The Los Angeles City Council is offering a $50,000 reward for information leading to those responsible for the fatal shooting of a 21-year-old University of Southern California music student gunned down in March, officials said Tuesday.

USC student Victor McElhaney is pictured playing drums. McElhaney died after he was shot near the USC campus.

USC student Victor McElhaney is pictured playing drums. McElhaney died after he was shot near the USC campus.

Victor McElhaney was leaving a liquor store with friends on March 10 in the area of Maple Avenue and Adams Boulevard at about 12:30 a.m., when the group was approached by at least three Hispanic men in their 20s in what the Los Angeles Police Department called a robbery “that went bad.”

Police said the perpetrators tried to rob the group, and at some point McElhaney was fatally shot. He died the next morning at a local hospital. The suspects are still outstanding.

Councilman Curren D. Price said he hopes the reward from the city of Los Angeles will prompt someone with information to come forward to help solve the case.

“Victor was a young man with so much promise, joy and spirit. A soul who left a profound impression in the world with his gifts and talents,” Price said in a statement Tuesday. “He had so much to live for and countless unfinished dreams.”

Surveillance video showed the perpetrators fleeing in a dark blue or gray sedan after the shooting.

LAPD described two suspects as being armed and being about 5 feet 10 inches tall. The third person was about 5 feet 6 inches tall.

“It’s disheartening to know the killers are still on the loose while a family and entire community continues to grieve in search for answers,” Price said. “I hope today’s action sends a clear message — we are committed to finding these killers and bringing them to justice.”

McElhaney, the son of Oakland City Councilwoman Lynette Gibson McElhaney, was described as a gifted musician who was pursuing his passion at USC.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.