Destroyed Files and Long Delays: California Police Slow to Release Misconduct Records

A California Highway Patrol vehicle is seen in an undated photo. CHP is one of several large agencies that have yet to produce records of shootings, serious uses of force and other police conduct under a landmark transparency law that went into effect in 2019. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

A California Highway Patrol vehicle is seen in an undated photo. CHP is one of several large agencies that have yet to produce records of shootings, serious uses of force and other police conduct under a landmark transparency law that went into effect in 2019. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Sexual assault in jail. Domestic violence complaints against an officer ignored. Knocked-out teeth followed by a cover-up.

Those cases involving California peace officers are detailed in documents recently made public under a landmark transparency law that undid decades of secrecy surrounding police internal affairs files.

But six months after Senate Bill 1421 went into effect, some of the state’s largest law enforcement agencies haven’t provided a single record.

Some law enforcement organizations are charging high fees for records, destroying documents and even ignoring court orders to produce the files.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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