Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House in East Hollywood Becomes L.A.’s First UNESCO World Heritage Site

Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House in East Hollywood is seen in an undated photo. (Credit: Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House in East Hollywood is seen in an undated photo. (Credit: Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

The Hollyhock House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, a building that was almost demolished in the 1940s, earned Los Angeles its first UNESCO World Heritage Site designation Sunday.

Built between 1918 and 1921 on a hill in East Hollywood, the house joins Wright’s more famous creations — the spiral-shaped Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City, Fallingwater in Pennsylvania, and Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz. — that collectively recognize the genius of Wright’s architecture as a cultural global treasure.

Eight of Wright’s buildings nationwide represent the first U.S. modern architecture designations on the World Heritage list.

Also included in the eight designated buildings are the Unity Temple in Oak Park, Ill.; the Frederick C. Robie House in Chicago; Taliesin in Spring Green, Wis.; and the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House in Madison, Wis.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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