For Latinos, El Paso Mass Shooting Is a Devastating New Low in Trump Era

Mother Aidee Gutierrez, right, originally from Mexico, and daughters Marlene Gutierrez and Brissa Martinez embrace at a makeshift memorial outside Walmart in El Paso, near the scene of a mass shooting that days before left at least 22 people dead, on Aug. 5, 2019. (Credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images)

Mother Aidee Gutierrez, right, originally from Mexico, and daughters Marlene Gutierrez and Brissa Martinez embrace at a makeshift memorial outside Walmart in El Paso, near the scene of a mass shooting that days before left at least 22 people dead, on Aug. 5, 2019. (Credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images)

Working with immigrants for 30 years, Pablo Alvarado has lived through decades of antagonism toward Latinos. It came in political waves that washed over California, Arizona and other states. There was Proposition 187 in the 1990s, the Minuteman protests, “America’s toughest sheriff” Joe Arpaio and his hard-line policing tactics.

Nothing compares to the reality Latinos are facing today, Alvarado said.

“It’s a destructive moment for this country,” said the executive director of the Los Angeles-based National Day Laborer Organizing Network. “This is the first time when I feel as if our adversaries have declared war against our immigrant community.”

The massacre of 22 people Saturday by a man who traveled 650 miles to a Walmart in El Paso, reportedly with the intention of shooting “as many Mexicans as possible,” marks what appears to be one of the deadliest hate crimes ever against Latinos.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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