Nearly Two-Thirds of California College Students Struggle With Costs and Work-School Balance: Survey

A Cal State Long Beach student in 2016 turned to transitional housing when she could not afford an apartment. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

A Cal State Long Beach student in 2016 turned to transitional housing when she could not afford an apartment. (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Nearly two-thirds of California students say their biggest obstacle to succeeding in college are costs, including tuition and living expenses, and juggling work with school, according to a survey released Thursday by the California Student Aid Commission.

More than one-third of the 15,000 students surveyed said they lacked stable housing and a steady source of food in the last month. Students in rural areas expressed the greatest hardship: 41% of Central Valley residents reported housing insecurity while 47% of those in the North Inland — the area of Shasta, Butte, Lassen, Plumas and Siskiyou counties — said they did not have regular access to sufficient nutritious food.

Among Los Angeles students, 30% reported housing insecurity, the lowest level in the state, and 33% faced food insecurity, the third-lowest level after the East Bay and wine country areas.

African American students faced the greatest struggles. More than half reported they lacked regular access to nutritious food and 40% said they did not have stable housing, the survey found. About 4 in 10 Latino students faced similar hardships, with about 3 in 10 Asian Americans and whites reporting such difficulties.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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