FDA Tried to Ban Flavors Years Before Vaping Outbreak, But Top Obama Officials Rejected Plan

A variety of electronic cigarette flavors are displayed for sale at Vape New York store on June 10, 2013.(Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

A variety of electronic cigarette flavors are displayed for sale at Vape New York store on June 10, 2013.(Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Unicorn Vomit. Cotton Candy. Gummy Bear. Skittles.

Some teenagers who tried these playful vaping flavors thought they were just inhaling water vapor — not also nicotine, a chemical considered as addictive as heroin and cocaine.

Now, as a mysterious vaping-related lung disease has doctors and parents urging the nation’s 3.6 million young users to quit, many are finding that they physically can’t — they’re hooked. It’s exactly the kind of youth addiction crisis the Food and Drug Administration had warned of four years ago, when it tried to ban flavored fluids for e-cigarettes.

If the FDA ban had gone through, the kid-friendly vaping liquids would have been pushed off store shelves.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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