L.A. to Erase More Than 1 Million Minor Citations in Bid to Help Homeless

A homeless encampment is seen in downtown Los Angeles on May 30, 2019. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

A homeless encampment is seen in downtown Los Angeles on May 30, 2019. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

In an effort to break a cycle that has made it harder for homeless people to find housing and services, Los Angeles officials announced Wednesday that they were erasing more than 1 million minor citations and warrants that they said had kept people trapped in the court system.

The announcement marks a major effort by law enforcement to change a system that has led to homeless people being repeatedly ticketed and arrested for minor infractions, such as sleeping on public property.

The trio of Los Angeles City Atty. Mike Feuer, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey and LAPD Chief Michel Moore said they agreed to “unclog” the court system of more than 300,000 older warrants and citations.

Officials called the plan the “Fugitive Misdemeanant Recovery Program” and said it would also save the courts money. Moreover, the action will help the LAPD and other police focus on getting the worst criminals off the streets instead of officers spending crucial time on minor infractions involving homeless people.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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